Jack Saturday

Monday, April 16, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1756-1758

“If your feelings are different from what you’re showing, you can start to get back strain, neck strain and stomachaches,” Grandey says. The toll of emotional labor at work can follow people after hours, too. A 2013 study of bus drivers found that those who reported faking emotions during the day were more likely to suffer from insomnia, anxiety and emotional exhaustion at home. A 2014 study of hotel managers by Grandey and colleagues found that people who had to feign their feelings on the job tended to be less helpful at home, presumably because they were too tired to pick up a broom or dishrag. And in yet-to-be-published research, Grandey and colleagues also found that people who fake positive emotions at less-than-positive jobs tend to drink more alcohol at home, perhaps because they feel inclined to cut loose after keeping things buttoned up. Other studies have suggested a similar lack of control with food. “You feel like you don’t have any willpower,” Grandey says.
Barista’s burden
Chris Woolston
Knowable Magazine

 [emphasis JS]


 We should be looking for new ways to organize, new ways to think and act ourselves into freedom. Instead, today we are on the road towards an existence plugged into a bio-monitor, our sleeping patterns logged, our calorie intake mandated by the people who pay us just enough to live.
Downward-Facing Capitalist Dogma
Josh Hall
The Baffler





 The 20th century income distribution system has broken down irretrievably. Globalisation, technological change and the move to flexible labour markets has channelled more and more income to rentiers – those owning financial, physical or so-called intellectual property – while real wages stagnate. The income of the precariat is falling and becoming more volatile. And chronic insecurity will not be overcome by minimum wage laws, tax credits, means-tested benefits or workfare. In short, a basic income is becoming a political imperative.
Guy Standing
The Guardian
Thu 12 Jan 2017

[emphasis JS]





Monday, April 09, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1753-1755

As some in the feminist school point out Adam Smith, when he wrote The Wealth of Nations, moved back in with his mother. She washed his clothes, cooked his meals and kept the candle wick trimmed. Without this labour (and the years spent raising and supporting him) his foundational work of modern economics would probably never have been written. And yet this essential labour does not figure in The Wealth of Nations and to this day remains outside the accounting practice of economics as it is practiced by government policy makers.
Artists, Housework and Learning to Unsee
John O'Brien

 [emphasis JS]




 We tell these girls they will go to a great college and doors will open up and they will “do great things” the world.

And some do great things in the world. Until age 30. Then most women choose to give more time to family than their career. Women don’t want to be the breadwinner. And women don’t want to work the ten-hour days that are required of people who have outstanding careers. Because they won’t see their kids.

So when you congratulate your daughter for getting good grades so she can go to a good college to get a good job, you devalue the job she is most likely to gravitate to: taking care of a family. You degrade that job as not a valid choice, the same way people in the 1950s degraded math and science as not a valid choice for girls.

When you tell girls what they should do with their future, you undermine the achievements of women’s rights in the 20th century. When we constantly devalue the choice most women are making — to scale back their career and focus on family — we take away the pride girls have in who they are: smart, educated, hard-working. You can be all those things and still decide taking care of family is most important.

Parents should validate that option as much as they validate the option of being president or running a science lab. Because your smart, educated daughter is much more likely to stay home with kids than do any of those jobs that require never seeing their kids.

Misogynist conversations women have all the time
Penelope Trunk
women

 [emphasis JS]


They were educated, hardworking, and ambitious, and now they were also poor—applying for food stamps, showing up in shelters, lining up for entry-level jobs in retail. This would have been the moment for the pundits to finally admit the truth: Poverty is not a character failing or a lack of motivation. Poverty is a shortage of money.

For most women in poverty, in both good times and bad, the shortage of money arises largely from inadequate wages. When I worked on my book, Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting By in America, I took jobs as a waitress, nursing-home aide, hotel housekeeper, Wal-Mart associate, and a maid with a house-cleaning service. I did not choose these jobs because they were low-paying. I chose them because these are the entry-level jobs most readily available to women.

What I discovered is that in many ways, these jobs are a trap: They pay so little that you cannot accumulate even a couple of hundred dollars to help you make the transition to a better-paying job. They often give you no control over your work schedule, making it impossible to arrange for child care or take a second job. And in many of these jobs, even young women soon begin to experience the physical deterioration—especially knee and back problems—that can bring a painful end to their work life.

It Is Expensive to Be Poor
Barbara Ehrenreich
The Atlantic

 [emphasis JS]







Monday, April 02, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1750-1752


KELOWNA — Well-meaning people who give away bottles and cans near recycling depots are only perpetuating poverty, Kelowna Mayor Colin Basran suggests.

...Council voted 6-3 to support changes to panhandling regulations that, for the first time, make it a ticketable offence to give away money, or recyclable items of some value, to other people in certain circumstances.

...Another change will see drivers who give money to panhandlers on medians at intersections also fined $250, as offering such donations is said to only encourage a form of begging that’s regarded as particularly unsafe and intimidating.


“That’s not a safe situation, and I know it makes people uncomfortable,” Coun. Luke Stack said.

RON SEYMOUR, THE DAILY COURIER 
Published on: March 27, 2018



It takes a deft touch to draw a decent heart in latte foam, but that’s not the hardest part about working as a barista. The real backbreaker: cheerfully greeting a hundred people in a row, even that one guy who hasn’t left a tip in three years but always complains that his coffee isn’t hot enough except for the times that it’s too hot.

For baristas, salespeople, flight attendants and many other service workers, fake smiles and forced pleasantries often come with the job description. But psychologists warn that emotions can’t just be flipped on like an espresso machine, and smiles aren’t as easy to put on as name tags. Feigning feelings at work — what psychologists call “emotional labor” — can be as mentally and physically taxing as any other type of workplace stress, but few workers or employers recognize the threat, says Neal Ashkanasy, a professor of business management at Queensland University in Brisbane, Australia. “People just put expressions on their faces without any idea what kind of stress it’s causing,” he says.
Barista’s burden

Chris Woolston
Knowable Magazine

[emphasis JS]


 

Equal parts Don Quixote and Che Guevara, Villarino describes his peregrinations as protests not just against boredom but also against parochialism and even capitalism. “The 12-hour workday,” he wrote in an early manifesto, “is more dangerous than hitchhiking.” As a Latin American, from a downwardly mobile middle-class family — he watched his parents be crushed by those 12-hour days —
...
 “I realized that you could work your whole life for a house, a career,” he said, “and overnight it all could vanish.” 
THE WORLD’S BEST HITCHHIKER ON THE SECRETS OF HIS SUCCESS  
NYT
 [emphasis JS]













Monday, March 26, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1747-1749

Forty percent of the 678,000 British Columbians living below the poverty line are working adults.
Friday, March 23, 2018
The Unsolved Riddle of Poverty Reduction
ECONOSPEAK





 If Nato was dissolved tomorrow, you’d be amazed how peaceful Europe would become. The reason for its existence – the USSR – vanished decades ago. We don’t keep up a huge alliance to protect us from the Austro-Hungarian empire, the Ottomans, or any other powers that have disappeared. So why this one? It was preserved to save the jobs and pensions of its staff. It was only expanded because American arms manufacturers were afraid they would lose business when the Cold War ended.
PETER HITCHENS: 

The 'patriotic' thought police came for Corbyn. You are next.
Daily Mail
17 March 2018 

[emphasis JS]



 Nearly half of all Disneyland Resort employees have gone hungry because they couldn’t afford to buy food, a survey found. More than one in 10 reported being homeless while working at the Magic Kingdom because of the low pay.
...
43 percent of employees needed, but couldn't afford, dental care. More than two-thirds enrolled in the company’s health insurance plan said they were forced to give up other necessities in order to make payments.

Eleven percent of those surveyed—including 13 percent of employees with young children—reported having been homeless in the past two years.

A further 46 percent said they had been forced to lower their food intake or have disrupted eating patterns. Fifteen percent of Disneyland employees receive food stamps.
...
“We are proud of our record as a quality employer,” Brown added. “We have created more than 4,000 jobs over the last five years—more than any other business in Orange County.”

Disneyland Workers Are Paid So Little, Many Are Hungry or Homeless
By Ewan Palmer / Newsweek via Alternet
March 1, 2018





Monday, March 19, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1744-1746


Why Companies and Countries Are Battling for Ascendancy in 5G
By DON CLARK and CECILIA KANG
Taking an early lead in ultrafast next-generation wireless technology can give players a strategic advantage.
NYT Headline
   March 07, 2018





  If those cuts had gone through, they would have exposed one of the biggest lies told about Big Pharma: that the current system of patents and price-gouging is just an unfortunate necessity to cover the cost of all their brave and noble R&D work.
...
Just how important is our publicly funded research to Big Pharma and Biotech? According to a new study by a small, partly industry-funded think tank called the Center for Integration of Science and Industry (CISI), it is existentially important. No NIH funds, no new drugs, no patents, no profits, no industry.
...
The authors found that each of the 210 medicines approved for market came out of research supported by the NIH. Of the $100 billion it spent nationally during this period, more than half of it—$64 billion—ended up helping the development of 84 first-in-class drugs.
...
...publicly funded labs conduct years of basic research to get to a breakthrough, which is then snatched up, tweaked, and patented (privatized) by companies who turn around and reap billions with 1,000-times-cost mark-ups on drugs developed with taxpayer money.
...
Those companies then spend the profits on executive bonuses and share buybacks, and lavish mass marketing campaigns to increase sales of amphetamines, benzos, opioids, and dick pills.
...
Why are we allowing drug companies to gain proprietary control over taxpayer-funded research, then turn around and price-gouge those same taxpayers to literal death?...

"... taxpayers fund the riskier part of drug development, then once the medicines show promise, they are often privatized under patent monopolies that lock in exorbitant prices for 20 years or longer,”...
By Alexander Zaitchik / Social Security Works
March 2, 2018, 10:46 AM GMT

[emphasis JS]



One of the many studies I would have funded had I hit one of the really big lotteries is on how much ostensibly private profit is gained from publicly funded research. Most of the iphone is derived from public research. The Weather Bureau costs about a billion a year to run, for a long time far beyond the ability of a single person to underwrite, and they gave away their output for free. Private profit, annually, from the Weather Bureau's research and forecasting? 100 billion dollars.

Where's my equity share of that? Where's yours?
Jack Strawb
 
[emphasis JS]







Monday, March 12, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1741-1743

Education is not vocational training, because training is not education. Animals and slaves are trained. Men and women are educated. The purpose of education is not a job--that’s the purpose of apprenticeship--or the housing of its students or the entertainment of its alumni or the national defense or the advancement of industry. The purpose of education is human freedom in so far as human freedom may be achievable through the cultivation of the intellect directed to the intelligent judgement of public and private affairs. ...the problem is to keep everything off the campus that has nothing to do with education for human freedom.
Milton Mayer
The Sellout






The U.S.-China Rivalry Is, More Than Ever, a Fight Over Tech
NYT Headline
March 07, 2018







 In the first days of the Trump administration, Carrier announced the company’s intent to close some Indiana operations and move production to Mexico. But politicians swooped in to save the day, and a deal was struck in which the state offered $7 million (over a decade) in economic development incentives. After a few photo ops with President Trump and other state politicians, interest in the story died down.

Today Carrier has already cut many of its Indiana jobs because the $7 million incentive wasn’t enough to offset the much lower production costs in Mexico. The incentive may have delayed Carrier’s decision long enough to confer some political credit, but many of the “saved” Carrier jobs are now lost.

Spending $7 million for no real impact may sound expensive, but other recent economic development offers are staggering, even for those of us who think we have seen everything. The State of Wisconsin is offering Foxconn $3 billion for electrical-component manufacturing opera
tions. The price tag for Amazon HQ2 is unknown, but the offers will most likely be in the billions for many locations.
Why Are Your State Tax Dollars Subsidizing Corporations?
By NATHAN M. JENSENMARCH 6, 2018
NYT Op-Ed




Monday, March 05, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1738-1740

As Kaveh Waddell explored in The Atlantic in 2016, companies including Accenture, Intel, IBM, and Twitter now use sentiment analysis to track their employees’ emotions. Last year the London newspaper The Daily Telegraph installed black boxes under every desk to track when their occupant was present (a move the paper said was to improve energy efficiency, but which staff feared was for more dubious purposes). Slack, now the global standard for team communication, allows employers to monitor private chats by default. And, last month, Amazon filed a patent for a piece of wearable tech that would enable them to track warehouse packers’ hand movements on the job—an obscene intrusion into employees’ autonomy, but one that is in keeping with the tendencies of a company for whom human employment seems to be simply an annoying step on the way to full automation.   
Downward-Facing Capitalist Dogma
Josh Hall
The Baffler

[emphasis JS]




 In Greek "necessity"- anangke, serves also as the word for "force," "constraint," "compulsion," violence, and "duress." Aristotle felt the need to eliminate the sense of "violence" from the word, when he used it in the context of the "necessity of being" in the Metaphysics. Apparently the Greeks understood very well the connection between necessity and violence, and the requisite that a citizen be a man of leisure indicates that necessity had passed from his life, and he could avoid violence in his thought and behaviour. Freedom to the Greeks could only exist after the conquest of necessity, which demeans man, causing him to have to live with force and violence, his very existence under duress. In that condition he could not be political. Under the pressure of necessity, he [sic] resorted to violence.
Earl Shorris, Scenes From Corporate Life

[emphasis JS]


 The 20th century income distribution system has broken down irretrievably. Globalisation, technological change and the move to flexible labour markets has channelled more and more income to rentiers – those owning financial, physical or so-called intellectual property – while real wages stagnate. The income of the precariat is falling and becoming more volatile. And chronic insecurity will not be overcome by minimum wage laws, tax credits, means-tested benefits or workfare. In short, a basic income is becoming a political imperative.
Guy Standing
The Guardian
Thu 12 Jan 2017

[emphasis JS]  

Monday, February 26, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1735-1737

By now it’s no longer just the Silicon Valley trend watchers and technoprophets who are apprehensive. In a study that has already racked up several hundred citations, scholars at Oxford University have estimated that no less than 47% of all American jobs and 54% of those in Europe are at a high risk of being usurped by machines. And not in a hundred years or so, but in the next 20. “The only real difference between enthusiasts and skeptics is a time frame,” notes a New York University professor. “But a century from now, nobody will much care about how long it took, only what happened next.”
World Economic Forum


 

In a 2013 survey of 12,000 professionals by the Harvard Business Review, half said they felt their job had no “meaning and significance,” and an equal number were unable to relate to their company’s mission, while another poll among 230,000 employees in 142 countries showed that only 13% of workers actually like their job. A recent poll among Brits revealed that as many as 37% think they have a job that is utterly useless.
Rutger Bregman,
 
World Economic Forum 



You must suffer to earn money. You are expected to “earn a living.” “Earning a living” means enduring your job and paying your dues like everyone else, in order to prove you’re worthy of subsistence in the eyes of capital, and in the eyes of those among your fellow hapless wage laborers who have internalized the Protestant work ethic.

And you must suffer in the proper way: silently, while  performing “positivity.” It’s not enough to be structurally exploited  by the need to sell your hours to employers so you can survive.  It’s not enough to conceal your misery about it, either. You must also express gratitude for your job. After all, it could be worse.  You’re lucky to have a job at all!  If you speak up about your  suffering, you risk being branded as “difficult” or “entitled” – a  complainer who deserves their fate.

This is what passes for a work ethic in the USA: the logic of the abuser, writ large.

D. JoAnne Swanson
The Anticareerist



Monday, February 19, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1732-1734

Andrew Yang, a well-connected New York businessman who is mounting a longer-than-long-shot bid for the White House.
...
“All you need is self-driving cars to destabilize society,” Mr. Yang, 43, said over lunch at a Thai restaurant in Manhattan last month, in his first interview about his campaign. In just a few years, he said, “we’re going to have a million truck drivers out of work who are 94 percent male, with an average level of education of high school or one year of college.”

“That one innovation,” he continued, “will be enough to create riots in the street. And we’re about to do the same thing to retail workers, call center workers, fast-food workers, insurance companies, accounting firms.”
His 2020 Campaign Message: The Robots Are Coming.
The Shift
By KEVIN ROOSE
NYT

[emphasis JS]




On a Saturday morning in 2013 in Brooklyn’s Dumbo neighborhood, an 18-year-old recycling worker, Luis Camarillo, was loading materials into a truck when the vehicle’s compactor crushed him. He was rushed to a hospital, where he died.

Mr. Camarillo’s death, while seemingly a freak accident, was in fact not unusual.
The Brutal Life of a Sanitation Worker
By CARL ZIMRINGFEB. 9, 2018
NYT



 A move to allow restaurants and other employers to impose tip sharing on workers, and in some cases keep the money, is under fire from labor groups.
Labor Dept. Plan Could Let the Boss Pocket the Tip  
By NOAM SCHEIBER
FEB. 4, 2018
NYT headline




Monday, February 12, 2018

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1729-1731

Bataille conceives of a general economy of global energy flows which inevitably generates a surplus of energy which must be expended. Under capitalism, excess (human energy not necessary to survival) is diverted into accumulation and endlessly-climbing profits for the ruling class…  Play is the refusal of regimentation, supervision and clocks. In this sense, play is a precondition for resistance, which demands time and energy for spontaneity, contemplation, communication, and unity. Play must be recovered.
Laura Martz
from
Free Time! Ludicity and the Anti-work Ethic
[emphasis JS]


In an “accidental” basic income pilot in North Carolina, where a longitudinal study of child development coincided with the decision of a Cherokee community to distribute casino profits to all tribal members, children in recipient families had fewer behavioural disorders, performed better in school, and were less likely to drift into crime.
Universal basic income is becoming an urgent necessity
Guy Standing
The Guardian
Thu 12 Jan 2017



 Today, the number of newsprint employees is down by over 55% since December 1998. The number of print magazine employees is down by 40%.
Bambi vs. Godzilla
Gary North
Specific Answers