Jack Saturday

Monday, August 22, 2016

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1497-1499


Loving money may not be good for your love life, according to new research that finds that materialists have unhappier marriages than couples who don't care much about possessions.

The effect holds true across all levels of income, said study researcher Jason Carroll, a professor of family life at Brigham Young University. And a materialist marrying a like-minded soul may not get off the hook: The least satisfying marriages were those in which both spouses cared strongly about material goods.

"We thought it would be the incongruent or unmatched pattern that would be most problematic, where one's a spender and one's a saver," Carroll told LiveScience. "Our study found that it's the couples where both spouses have high levels of materialism that struggle the most.
...
 So what can be done if you love your spouse but really want that shiny new BMW, too? Carroll said that for most people, materialism isn't black-and-white: People think they can pursue their toys but keep their relationship strong at the same time, and they may not realize how much their ambitions are hurting their loved ones. For most couples, breaking the materialistic thought process should help, Carroll said.

"I think it's about people stepping back and taking an inventory of their values and what really is important to them," Carroll said. "Are we allowing some of our materialistic ambitions to get in the way of things that really, at the core, matter a lot to us?"
Love of Money May Mess Up Your Marriage
Stephanie Pappas, Live Science Contributor | October 13, 2011

[emphasis JS]





I had a summer job as a student squeezing plastic milk bottles for 12 hours overnight to see if they leaked. When they did you smelt of sour milk by the time you went home. Mark Thomas, Manchester

Filling pork pies with jelly one at a time to ensure the "handmade" label. Leigh Dickinson

I worked for weeks unpacking small cereal bars from large boxes and then repackaging the same cereal bars into smaller boxes. Pointless. Jude Connor

I put pepperoni on 14,000 pizzas per day at a factory in Nottingham. If the conveyor belt broke down, we made smiley faces on the pizzas with the pepperoni. So if you ever see a smiley pizza, that's why. Pete Minting, Helensburgh

Working at a pork scratching factory removing the ones that had been cooked but still had hairs to then be re-cooked, to burn them off. I had 12 hours a day just watching them go past on a conveyor belt. I left after two weeks and have never eaten one since. Maria, Sheffield
Some of the world's most boring jobs
BBC News
1 August 2016

[emphasis JS]

Thanks to Kate McFarland
@kate_bi_news 


 
For complex reasons, our culture allows "economy" to mean only "money economy." It equates success and even goodness with monetary profit because it lacks any other standard of measurement. I am no economist, but I venture to suggest that one of the laws of such an economy is that a farmer is worth more dead than alive. A second law is that anything diseased is more profitable than anything that is healthy. What is wrong with us contributes more to the "gross national product" than what is right with us.
Wendell Berry,
The Gift of Good Land: Further Essays Cultural and Agricultural (San Francisco: North Point Press, 1981) xiii.








Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1497-1499


Loving money may not be good for your love life, according to new research that finds that materialists have unhappier marriages than couples who don't care much about possessions.

The effect holds true across all levels of income, said study researcher Jason Carroll, a professor of family life at Brigham Young University. And a materialist marrying a like-minded soul may not get off the hook: The least satisfying marriages were those in which both spouses cared strongly about material goods.

"We thought it would be the incongruent or unmatched pattern that would be most problematic, where one's a spender and one's a saver," Carroll told LiveScience. "Our study found that it's the couples where both spouses have high levels of materialism that struggle the most.
...
 So what can be done if you love your spouse but really want that shiny new BMW, too? Carroll said that for most people, materialism isn't black-and-white: People think they can pursue their toys but keep their relationship strong at the same time, and they may not realize how much their ambitions are hurting their loved ones. For most couples, breaking the materialistic thought process should help, Carroll said.

"I think it's about people stepping back and taking an inventory of their values and what really is important to them," Carroll said. "Are we allowing some of our materialistic ambitions to get in the way of things that really, at the core, matter a lot to us?"
Love of Money May Mess Up Your Marriage
Stephanie Pappas, Live Science Contributor | October 13, 2011

[emphasis JS]





I had a summer job as a student squeezing plastic milk bottles for 12 hours overnight to see if they leaked. When they did you smelt of sour milk by the time you went home. Mark Thomas, Manchester

Filling pork pies with jelly one at a time to ensure the "handmade" label. Leigh Dickinson

I worked for weeks unpacking small cereal bars from large boxes and then repackaging the same cereal bars into smaller boxes. Pointless. Jude Connor

I put pepperoni on 14,000 pizzas per day at a factory in Nottingham. If the conveyor belt broke down, we made smiley faces on the pizzas with the pepperoni. So if you ever see a smiley pizza, that's why. Pete Minting, Helensburgh

Working at a pork scratching factory removing the ones that had been cooked but still had hairs to then be re-cooked, to burn them off. I had 12 hours a day just watching them go past on a conveyor belt. I left after two weeks and have never eaten one since. Maria, Sheffield

BBC News

1 August 2016
[emphasis JS]

Thanks to Kate McFarland
@kate_bi_news 


 
For complex reasons, our culture allows "economy" to mean only "money economy." It equates success and even goodness with monetary profit because it lacks any other standard of measurement. I am no economist, but I venture to suggest that one of the laws of such an economy is that a farmer is worth more dead than alive. A second law is that anything diseased is more profitable than anything that is healthy. What is wrong with us contributes more to the "gross national product" than what is right with us.
Wendell Berry,
The Gift of Good Land: Further Essays Cultural and Agricultural (San Francisco: North Point Press, 1981) xiii.








Monday, August 15, 2016

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1494-1496

Blake’s isolation was — I sometimes think it still is — absolute. It was the isolation of a mind that sought to make the best of heaven and earth, in the image of neither. It was isolation of a totally different kind of human vision; of an unappeasable longing for the absolute integration of man [sic], in his total nature, with the universe. It was the isolation of a temperament run on fixed ideas; and incidentally, of a craftsman who could not earn a living.
...
...the engraver who stopped getting assignments because he turned each one into an act of independent creation.
[emphasis JS]



In a future where automation has taken most human “jobs,” will humans stop working? It all depends on how you define work, says Ray Kurzweil. He favors the idea of a universal basic income to cover the necessities, but he doesn’t think that means we won’t work.
 

We’ll just do more of the things we’ve always wanted to but didn’t have time.

Once we no longer have to work to live—we can begin to live to work. And then we’ll be
free to engage fully and unabashedly in passionate pursuits, regardless of income. Imagine the innovation and invention that might follow if our whole civilization pursued its highest aspirations instead of spending most of our time working for basic sustenance.
Ray Kurzweil: The Future Offers Meaningful Work, Not Meaningless Jobs

By Andrew O'Keefe
SingularityHUB

Aug 11, 2016

[emphasis JS]


 There’s something dangerous happening to millions of Americans nationwide. It is happening in places where many people spend at least 40 hours a week. It is causing severe physical and mental illness. It runs off fear and manipulation. But its victims are not talking it about. 


So what is it?

Work abuse.

Look around the average American workplace and it’s not too hard to find. Twenty-seven percent of all adult Americans report experiencing work abuse and an additional 21 percent of Americans report witnessing it, meaning some 65 million Americans have been affected. ...

In their book, Wyatt and Hare, who was a work abuse victim, call the majority of workplaces (95 percent) “authoritarian work organizations.”

“These are places that have, to some degree or another, a slave-to-slave-owner mentality operating,” Wyatt said.
How to deal with your narcissistic bullying boss before you get PTSD

Alyssa Figueroa, AlterNet
10 Aug 2016
 






 

Monday, August 08, 2016

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1491-1493


A Frenchman is suing his former employer for "bore out" - boredom's equivalent of burnout - which he says turned him into a "professional zombie". Frederic Desnard wants 360,000 euros (£300,000) for being "killed professionally through boredom" by his 80,000-euro-a-year job as an executive in a perfume business. But is "bore out" real?

"It was just so boring. I felt ill knowing I had to go back on Monday morning," says Steve Coster about his time as an insurance broker.
Is there such a thing as 'bore out'?
...
It can have "severe" consequences including reduced life expectancy, she says, highlighting a study of 7,000 UK civil servants which found very bored workers were more likely to die during a 24-year research period than those who were not bored.
By Alex Morrison, Alex Therrien & Emma Ailes 
BBC News
26 July 2016
[emphasis JS] 

Thanks to Kate McFarland
@kate_bi_news





 …a woman in New York was arrested for defecating on her boss's desk after she won $3 million in the lottery…
Harper's Weekly Review
August 3, 2016






From an email exchange: Jack S. to Gerry Spence:

…there is plenty of wealth to go round and that there
should be a guaranteed income for all.  What is your opinion of this?



Couldn't agree more.  Gerry






Monday, August 01, 2016

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1488-1490

In a recent Gallup poll, 70 percent of American workers said they were not engaged with their jobs, or were actively disengaged.
By AARON HURST
New York Times
APRIL 19, 2014




 Essentially we’re just asking people to think about the world they live in. We would hope that people would question a system that can land a spacecraft on a comet millions of miles away but can’t figure out the three-day week or eradicating poverty on this planet. We don’t want to tell people they have to feel bad about these things, we just want people to realize that everyone’s in the same boat, and we want to ask people to act collectively, to demand better things.
   spokesperson from STRIKE!    
    [emphasis JS]



Paul Solman: What was the most trenchant objection you heard when you came out with that book 10 years ago?

Charles Murray: The ordinary objection to the guaranteed basic income is first, work disincentives. There are answers to that. You have a very high cutoff point, whereby people have to start losing their stipend. So I made the cutoff point $25,000 in income that you get to make or keep.

It could be higher. This is a matter of the details. It’s absolutely essential that you allow people to get jobs and keep hold of their money for a substantial amount of money. Another important objection is that you’re just going to have people go out and use the money for a get-together and rent a house on a remote beach in California and surf their lives away.

Paul Solman: And smoke dope.

Charles Murray: My reaction to that is, so what? We have a huge problem with people dropping out of the workforce right now. It’s not going to be any worse [with a guaranteed income]. And in fact, it’ll be better because I think we’re going to make it much more visible to people that they can have a middle class life if they combine some work with the basic income.

So there are lots of reasonable objections to a guaranteed basic income. There are lots of ways you can do it wrong, where it’ll make matters much, much worse than they are now. My argument is that you can do it right and avoid all the obvious pitfalls.

What’s Wrong with the Current System?

Paul Solman: What’s an example of doing it wrong?

Charles Murray: Doing it wrong would be to add a guaranteed basic income onto the current system. Then you have all of the defects of the current system, all the ways the government stage manages people’s lives, all the ways in which they have incentives to game the system, and you add on just a whole bundle of cash to that.

Paul Solman: And I know, having read you for years, that part of your objection to the current system is the sprawl of the bureaucracy and costs that don’t actually benefit anybody but the people who have the jobs.

Charles Murray: In a sense, I’ve always taken the view that saving money isn’t a big deal with this. It’s nice if we don’t pay bureaucrats that aren’t doing anything useful. It’s nice if we save some of that money.

But what I’m talking about is going to be expensive. It’s actually now not going to be as expensive as the current system. When I wrote “In Our Hands” in 2004, I calculated the cost of that system would cross with the costs of the existing system in 2011, and I was right.
Libertarian Charles Murray: The welfare state has denuded our civic culture
BY CHARLES MURRAY  April 10, 2014

[emphasis JS]





Monday, July 25, 2016

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1485-1487

It is not enough to be busy. So are the ants. The question is: What are we busy about?
Henry David Thoreau











Even the busy bees and ants of Aesopian fame dedicate only about 20 percent of the day to doing chores like gathering nectar or tidying up the nest. Otherwise, the insects stay still. "They seem to have run out of work to do," said Dr. Gene E. Robinson, an entomologist at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign. "They really do look lazy."
Busy as a Bee? Then Who's Doing the Work? 
by Natalie Angier, NYT 30 July 1991






Interest rates are negative. Better than free borrowing is what that means. Why? Because the ultra rich have so much there’s nowhere good left to put it. Just to shove it in the bank. Hence, they’ll pay for the privilege of lending it. Supply and demand.

Leaders should be crying “hallelujah!”, taking this money, and giving it in great gobs to the young, the middle, the poor. Investing in all the public goods they’ve left in ruins, healthcare, education, transport, etc.

Why? Because average people are getting effectively poorer. Their lives are beginning to really collapse. And they’re turning now to strongmen and demagogues to rescue them.

Society is beginning to turn on itself because money is not flowing. It’s not doing anything just sitting there, right? That’s why the economy is stuck, stagnant, broken. It’s like a dammed river gone stagnant and murky.

They should be showering people with money. Nothing could be more obvious. But leaders across the world aren’t doing that. Not a single one.
umair haque
[emphasis JS]





Monday, July 18, 2016

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1482-1484


Robert Nilsson, a 25-year-old mechanic in Sweden's second city Gothenburg, may be the harbinger of a future where people work less and still enjoy a high standard of living.

He gets out of bed at the same time as everyone else, but instead of rushing to work, he takes it easy, goes for a jog, enjoys his breakfast, and doesn't arrive at his Toyota workshop until noon, only to punch out again at 6:00 pm. Toyota's Gothenburg branch introduced the six-hour day in 2002 to make its facilities more efficient by having two shifts, one in the morning and one in the afternoon, instead of a single, longer one.
Nilsson confirms that in his experience a six-hour day -- paid as much as eight -- is more efficient because it requires fewer breaks.
"Every time you have a break, it takes 10 to 15 minutes to get back to work, because you have to see where you were when you left off," he said.
That efficiency is reflected in the salary, as the Toyota workshop pays technicians like Nilsson 29,700 Swedish kronor (3,300 euro, $4,510) a month, well above the 25,100 kronor (2,790 euro, $3,810) national average for workers in the private sector.

"It was a huge success straight away," said Toyota service centre manager Elisabeth Jonsson.

"We saw the results, and everything was working for the staff, for the company, for the customers, so I don't think we ever had any discussion about putting an end to it."
[emphasis JS]


Working at walmart is one of the most unpleasant experiences of my life. I worked in the maintenance department;( which is a euphemism for custodial; which is a euphemism for janitorial.) With about eight or nine other guys. WAY too many. Because of that, most of the time you'll have about three people doing all the work, while the rest are sleeping in their cars or standing around talking. The manager's worked with my so called supervisor to schedule me so that I was ALWAYS running a machine while the rest didn't do JACK SHIT, rather than simply rotating it around, to keep it fair. Don't ask me why. It was like this for over a year. I didn't say anything because I figured they would at least appreciate me for being a team player. (lol, I know, right?) Finally, one day I got into a debate with a guy over who was the better working in maintenance and because I beat him the truth finally came out: He said they laughed at me behind my back, and took my "perseverance" for good ol fashion stupidity. I knew they'd always felt that way, but to have them tell it to me in my face was more than I could handle. I lost it. So I went to the supervisor and asked him for ONE DAY off the machines. Think about that. ONE FUCKING DAY. He was NEVER on the machines working. His pal was NEVER on the machine working. The others at least as two or three days off. When I ask him for one day, he immediately said no and that if I had a problem with it, then I should go to a manager. I went to her, and she gave me the run around. My supervisor literally LAUGHED when he heard her bullshitting me. So what I did, I got a print out of the schedule they were using that SHOWED how they were mistreating me, and I spoke with the head manager. I had a VERY long talk with him, and I have to admit, at one point I actually cried while talking about how managed and the co workers were doing me. He kept me off the machines, I made some enemies, but I solved the problem. Walmart can be a HORRIBLE place to work. Don't tolerant work place mistreatment at Walmart. At Walmart, your bosses and co workers look for signs of weakness. Once they spot 'em, they'll take advantage of you and make your life a living hell. Course I guess that's everywhere....
MrSihrus2
Comment on YouTube video
[emphasis JS]



It is cheaper to give homeless people a home than it is to leave them on the streets.
That’s not just the opinion of advocates working to end homelessness, nor is it the opinion of homeless people themselves. It is a fact that has been borne out by studies across the country, from Florida to Colorado and beyond.
The latest analysis to back up this fact comes out of Charlotte, where researchers from the University of North Carolina Charlotte examined a recently constructed apartment complex that was oriented towards homeless people.
Moore Place opened in 2012 with 85 units. Each resident is required to contribute 30 percent of his or her income, which includes any benefits like disability, veterans, or Social Security, toward rent. The rest of the housing costs, which total approximately $14,000 per person annually, are covered by a mix of local and federal government grants, as well as private donors.
In the first year alone, researchers found that Moore Place saved taxpayers $1.8 million. These savings comes from improvements in two primary areas: health care and incarceration.
Residents of Moore Place collectively visited the emergency room, an expensive but not uncommon way homeless people access health care, 447 fewer times in the year after getting housing, the study discovered. Similarly, they spent far less time running afoul of the law, with the number of arrests dropping 78 percent
BY SCOTT KEYES UPDATED: MARCH 24, 2014
[emphasis JS]






Tuesday, July 12, 2016

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1479-1481

Basic income is a universal income grant available to every citizen without means test or work requirement. Academic discussion of basic income and related policies has been growing in the fields of economics, philosophy, political science, sociology, and public policy over the last few decades — with dozens of journal articles published each year, and basic income constituting the subject of more than 30 books in the last 10 years. In addition, the political discussion of basic income has been expanding through social organizations, NGOs and other advocacy groups. Internationally, recent years have witnessed the endorsement of basic income by grassroots movements as well as government officials in developing countries such as Brazil or South-Africa.
Basic Income Studies



In his new book, Raising the Floor: How a Universal Basic Income Can Renew Our Economy and Rebuild the American Dream, Stern argues that technology is replacing jobs at an accelerating rate, and that this trend is permanent and threatens our society with massive job losses over the next few decades in both blue- and white-collar sectors of the economy. His premise is that this rate of change is historically without precedent and reflects an “inflection point”—a permanent paradigmatic shift in how work is and will be organized apart from anything to do with the business cycle. “We are heading off a cliff,” Stern says, and traditional liberal approaches can’t stop us.

The only solution that makes sense is a radical one; namely, a Universal Basic Income in which every person is given a fixed amount of money per year, a “floor” upon which individuals can build wealth by engaging in further work (there is no ceiling, only a floor) or which can be used as a security blanket for those who want the economic freedom to explore personal growth or leisure activity.
By Michael Bader, DMH / AlterNet July 1, 2016
[emphasis JS]





There is no more fatal blunderer than he who consumes the greater part of his life getting his living.
Henry David Thoreau









Monday, July 04, 2016

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1476-1478

Would Ms. Macy’s readers accept it if their jobs were lost to robots and precision manufacturing systems? Trade redistributes jobs but automation directly redistributes gains upwards – the gains are fully captured by owners of capital. Would Ms. Macy write a book about “unfettered automation” and CEOs that profit from robots on the assembly line? I suspect not. Why? Because robots are not foreigners, they do not belong to a strange and foreign culture and they cannot be demonized as slave labor.
Ravi Aron 
Baltimore June 25, 2015
Comment



Globally, the richest 1% now own nearly half of all the world’s wealth. The poorest 50% of the world, by contrast—fully 3 billion people—own less than 1% of its wealth.


By Simon Reid-Henry / University of Chicago Press
November 30, 2015 





To have done anything just for money is to have been truly idle.

Henry David Thoreau












Monday, June 27, 2016

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom #Quotations Of The Week 1473-1475

Between the ’80s and the aughts, when I had my children, a cloud of economic anxiety descended on parents, tightening what the sociologist Arlie Hochschild has called “the time bind.” The workweek of salaried professionals ballooned from 40 hours to 50 hours or more, not counting the email catch-up done after the kids’ bedtime. Union protections, predictable schedules and benefits vanished for vast numbers of blue-collar workers. Their jobs in the service or on-demand economies now pay so little, and child care costs so much (168 percent more than it did a quarter-century ago) that parents have to stitch together multiple jobs. Meanwhile, terrified that their offspring will sink even lower, parents siphon off time and money to hand-raise children who can compete in a global economy.
How to Fix Feminism
Judith Shulevitz
New York Times
(emphasis JS)




The wealthiest nations are failing the most disadvantaged of their children, the United Nations reported Wednesday in a study that showed widening disparities even between the middle and lowest household income levels.

The study, published by the United Nations Children’s Fund, or Unicef, focused not on the gap between the richest and poorest segments of societies but rather on the widening disparities between children at the bottom and their peers in the middle.

The purpose of the study, Unicef said in releasing the report, was to “highlight how far children are falling behind in the dimensions of income, education, health and life satisfaction.
Children in Rich Nations
New York Times
By RICK GLADSTONE
APRIL 13, 2016
(emphasis JS)




Meaningless work is a form of killing time. But leisure makes time come alive. The Chinese character for being busy is also made up of two elements: heart and killing.
David Steindl-Rast

thanks to Maria Popova









Monday, June 20, 2016

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1470-1472

According to its recent report, 25 percent of law schools obtain at least 88 percent of their total revenues from tuition. The average for all law schools is 69 percent. So law schools have a powerful incentive to maintain or increase enrollment, even if the employment outcomes are dismal for their graduates....
...
While enrollment did decline to about 38,000 last year from 52,000 in 2010, it has not been falling at the pace necessary to reach equilibrium in a stagnant legal job market. Too many incoming law school students still believe they will be among the lucky few who get decent jobs.
Too Many Law Students, Too Few Legal Jobs
By STEVEN J. HARPER
New York Times
AUG. 25, 2015
[emphasis JS]



I was the envy of my 30-something friends in Palo Alto, Calif. I had my own law office right on California Avenue. People charged with crimes handed me cash, in advance, over a big oak desk. Occasionally, I’d make a couple of grand in an afternoon.

But soon, my body started giving out one part at a time. First a shoulder, then my lower back, knee cartilage, neck vertebrae. Two groin hernia surgeries later, at 33 years old, I could not lift a bag of groceries, or sit without an orthopedic pillow. After 10 years as a law student and lawyer, working in a profession I didn’t like was taking its toll.
...
I could see myself in a billowy clown suit. After a free training session, I purchased the starter kit for $59 and waited for them to call.

Within a week, the company dispatched me to a party for a 7-year-old at a Ground Round restaurant in Yonkers. I applied colorful makeup, donned oversize shoes, orange wig, bag of tricks. It took a minute to decide on “Bobo” as my name. I silly-walked up to a table of children in the party room. By the end of the performance, the birthday boy said to me, “Bobo, I love you.” In the car later, I rested my head on the steering wheel. An unexpected feeling surfaced: happiness.
New York Times
By Robert Markowitz 
August 20, 2015
[emphasis JS]



The amount of those employed within the total population is at a record 38-year low of 62.6%. Meanwhile, despite slowing, GDP is still growing, so all the work is still obviously getting done somehow...
...
    Those who moved into optimal jobs showed significant improvement in mental health compared to those who remained unemployed. Those respondents who moved into poor-quality jobs showed a significant worsening in their mental health compared to those who remained unemployed.

That's right, having no job at all can be better than having a bullshit one. Thanks, science. And if low-skill jobs are more likely to be worse on mental health than medium and high-skill jobs, then for decades we've been increasingly working in newly created jobs that are depressingly worse for us than not working in any job.
...
So unless we all wish to pursue insecure lives of low-skill underpaid mostly meaningless employment thanks to all the machines increasingly doing all the rest of the work (not really for us but mostly for the benefit of those who own them), we will need to break the connection between work and income by providing everyone an income floor sufficient to both meet basic needs and purchase the goods and services the machines are providing. 

Scott Santens[emphasis JS]