Jack Saturday

Monday, August 14, 2017

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1651-1653

A good starting point is the simple reality that most of what we all receive as “income” far, far exceeds what anyone can claim as the result of the “work” they actually do in the here and now. Once this fully documented reality is understood, the moral case for a basic income for all becomes very different from conventional understandings. The starting point is recognition that most “income” is, in fact, a gift of the past.
...
A person born at the end of the current century will have done absolutely nothing to enable or deserve this enormous gain. All of it will come to that person as a gift from the past, mainly from the accumulation of technological and scientific knowledge she receives just by being born.
...
The gift of the past includes thousands of years of accumulated knowledge and technology — arithmetic, calculus, electricity, chemistry, physics, automobiles, airplanes, engines, computers, the internet, modern medicine, and on and on. In the 1950s M.I.T. economist Robert Solow demonstrated that nearly 90 percent of productivity growth up to that point in the 20th century was due to technical change (including technology, knowledge, education, and various related factors) rather than as a result of current labor and capital. He later won a Nobel Prize in Economics for the resulting contributions to the theory of economic growth.
...
The gift of the past includes thousands of years of accumulated knowledge and technology — arithmetic, calculus, electricity, chemistry, physics, automobiles, airplanes, engines, computers, the internet, modern medicine, and on and on. In the 1950s M.I.T. economist Robert Solow demonstrated that nearly 90 percent of productivity growth up to that point in the 20th century was due to technical change (including technology, knowledge, education, and various related factors) rather than as a result of current labor and capital. He later won a Nobel Prize in Economics for the resulting contributions to the theory of economic growth.
Technological Inheritance and the Case for a Basic Income
Gar Alperovitz
Economic Security Project

 [emphasis JS]


 A veteran Mountie based in Courtenay is suing the RCMP, alleging she was subjected to years of sexist and racist harassment.

The allegations come just months after the RCMP announced a record $100-million compensation package for women who were sexually harassed while working for the national force. The RCMP has come under fire for allowing a toxic work environment that has contributed to low morale and mental-health issues for members.

In May, a report by the Civilian Review and Complaints Commission for the RCMP criticized the national police force for its failure to address widespread bullying and harassment.

Ian MacPhail, the commission’s chairman, urged the federal government to bring in civilian governance after he concluded the force’s top brass is incapable of making reforms to its dysfunctional culture.
Island officer sues RCMP, alleging harassment

Katie DeRosa / Times Colonist
August 9, 2017 10:25 PM
[emphasis JS]




 This era of Industry 4.0 is being driven by the same technological advances that enable the capabilities of the smartphones in our pockets. It is a mix of low-cost and high-power computers, high-speed communication and artificial intelligence. This will produce smarter robots with better sensing and communication abilities that can adapt to different tasks, and even coordinate their work to meet demand without the input of humans.
...
Again, in an ideal scenario, humans may be able to focus on doing the things that make us human, perhaps fuelled by a basic income generated from robotic work. Ultimately, it will be up to us to define whether the robotic workforce will work for us, with us, or against us.

Jeff Morgan
Thursday 20 July 2017
Does The Next Industrial Revolution spell the end of manufacturing jobs












Monday, August 07, 2017

Anti Wage-Slavery Pro-Freedom Quotations Of The Week 1648-1650

Ultimately, humans haven’t become completely redundant: while robots may be efficient, they’re also a bit stupid. They do not think, they just act – in accurate, but limited, ways. Humans are still needed to work around robots, doing the jobs the machines aren't able to and fixing them when they get stuck. But this is all set to change, thanks to a new wave of smarter, better value machines that can adapt to multiple tasks. This change will be so significant that it will create a new industrial revolution.
Jeff Morgan
The Independent
Thursday 20 July 2017
Does The Next Industrial Revolution spell the end of manufacturing jobs?

[emphasis JS]


  "If you don't like this job, there are plenty who can take your place." Workers are no longer participants in the success of the company or institution but its slaves. People are reluctant to challenge any policies that they feel might harm the organization. Bosses can command almost anything, knowing that the workers will have to submit. "Cutbacks" simply mean that you are having three do what six used to do or a teacher managing a class of thirty-five or forty rather than twenty-five.
    Lars
    Winder, GA
comment on
The Jobless Trap
By PAUL KRUGMAN
Published: April 21, 2013
[emphasis JS]


The best day’s of the week to post your blog articles are Tuesday and Wednesday. I have had hundreds of websites and blogs and across all niches it seems that the most traffic is around on a Wednesday followed closely by a Tuesday. I think this has a lot to do with people being at work and bored and looking for something else to do.
What is the Best Time to Publish Blog Posts?
[emphasis JS]